Monday, February 6, 2017

Phineas Franklin Ellis Obituary

Phineas Franklin Ellis, 79, died at a Mars Hill hospital May 6, 1976 following a long illness. He was born in Castle Hill, August 15, 1896, the son of Jasper O. and Lucy E. Wilcox Ellis. He graduated from Ashland High School as valedictorian in 1915, attended Presque Isle Normal School, now known as University of Maine at Presque Isle, taught school in Ashland (Frenchville area) in 1915 and 1916.

On January 1, 1917 he became the first mail carrier on the RFD 2 mail line out of Ashland that he helped establish by petitioning the government. He served in the medical corps in World War I. Upon returning from the Army, he became manager of the Mapleton Local of the Aroostook Federation of Farmers. He married Mildred Chandler on August 22, 1923, moved to Caribou and was employed by the Maine Potato Growers Exchange known as the “Co-Op.” He returned to Castle Hill, built a home and went into farming and lumbering.

His political career began in April of 1919 when elected third selectman to the Town of Castle Hill. He was elected first selectman and chairman of the board in 1920 – 21. From 1927 to 1935 he was town auditor for Castle Hill, serving again as selectman in 1939 and again 1940. In 1941 the town adopted the town manager system and he became the first town manager for Castle Hill from 1941 to 1956 and Castle Hill and Mapleton from 1947 to 1956. He was representative to the 87th Legislature in 1935, the 88th in 1937, and the 93rd in 1947, serving Ashland, Castle Hill, Masardis, Portage, Garfield, Nashville, and Ox Bow. He clerked on the Taxation Committee for the 89th Legislature in 1939 and for the 90th in 1941.

He was a member of the Castle Hill School Board for 28 consecutive years and was president of the Presque Isle General Hospital Board in April of 1956 when he accepted the position as administrator of the hospital. He worked toward having a new hospital on a new site. The Arthur R. Gould Memorial Hospital opened for business in February of 1960 with Mr. Ellis as its first administrator. He remained administrator until June 1961 when he was appointed director of public relations for the hospital. He remained in this position about one and one-half years before retiring at age 67. The “retirement” ended when he accepted the job as head of the supply department of the Indian Head Plywood Corp. He remained in this position until August, 1973 when at age 77 he actually retired.

He had been a 4-H leader, member of the Washburn Rotary Club, member of the Grange, and the Farm Bureau Extension. He was a member of the State Road Advent Church. He became very interested in the tales he heard throughout the years regarding the Cullen lynching. In 1952 he researched and compiled a complete account of the double slaying of Hayden and Hubbard which led to the vigilante hanging of Jim Cullen. He had been asked throughout the years to lecture at Rotarys, Granges, and schools on Maine’s only lynching.

He had been active in his retirement, gardening, lecturing, attending meetings for the senior citizens and writing his book “Call Me Phin.” In his own words, “I have worked quietly down through the years suggesting something for the better whenever I had the chance and just hope to someday leave a few footprints on the sands of time.”

He is survived by his wife, Mildred Chandler Ellis, Mapleton; one son, Malcolm, Ashland; two daughters, Mrs. Myron Myrtle Goodwin, Kennebunk, Mrs. Eugene Elaine Hotham, Presque Isle; four brothers, Luther, Alonzo, and Wilson, all of Castle Hill, Forest, Ashland; three sisters, Mrs. Dorcas Chandler, Kittery, Mrs. Opal Ellis, Ashland, Mrs. Murray Sarah Murphy, Presque Isle; 10 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren.

Friends may call at Graves Funeral Home, Presque Isle, Friday from 7 – 9 p.m. Funeral services will be held at the funeral home Saturday at 1 p.m. with Rev. David Ross, pastor of the State Road Advent Christian Church, officiating. Burial will be in the Ellis Cemetery, Ashland. Those who wish may contribute to the State Road Advent Christian Church, in his memory, or to the Memorial Fund of the Arthur R. Gould Memorial Hospital.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Guilford Smith Likes to Suck Eggs


To order your copy of "Call Me Phin," CLICK HERE.

In 1921, Phineas Ellis was elected First Selectman of Castle Hill with his future father-in-law, Charles (C. G. R.) Chandler elected Second Selectman and Guilford Smith elected Third Selectman.

 

Starting on the first Mondays in April, the Selectmen, who were also assessors, visited each taxpayer to take inventory and to collect school taxes. It was a three-day process and the gentlemen would be invited to dinner at someone’s home, sometimes paying fifty cents each and eating their fill.

 

As Phin describes one particular occasion:

“One day, in each of the three years, Mrs. Granville (Eleanor) Cook was called and told she could expect us for dinner. In 1921 we were about one half hour early arriving at the Cook’s home on the Haystack Road. Eleanor suggested that we go to the barn and take inventory while the dinner finished cooking. She said, ‘Granville is out there doing the chores. By the time you finish, dinner will be cooked and ready to serve piping hot.’

Charles, Guilford, and I went to the barn and found Granville feeding the stock their noon meal. It was noticed that the hens had nests in several places. That day I learned that Guilford liked to suck eggs. He would pick up an egg, step around a corner out of sight and suck it. He continued doing this all the while we were taking inventory. Granville never noticed what was taking place. Just how many eggs Guilford put under his belt that day will never be known.

As we filed in from the barn, Mrs. Cook said, ‘Now boys, take off your duds and dinner will be on in about two shakes.’ She handed Granville a kettle and commanded, ‘Run back to the barn and gather some eggs.’ He obeyed her command and went to the barn on a run. He did not return as quickly as Eleanor had hoped so she went to the door and hollered, ‘Come on, hurry! Dinner will be cold if you don’t get a wiggle on.’ Granville came hurrying back saying, ‘Eleanor, I couldn’t find a damned egg. Can’t figure out what has happened. The hens have been laying good. I just don’t understand what has happened today.’

 

Mrs. Cook said, ‘Well, come boys sit right down at the table. We will eat the ham anyway, eggs or no eggs.’ Guilford kept his face straight but it must have been quite an effort. He never looked up and before we had finished eating, he began to urge Charles and I to hurry. He said, ‘You know boys, we still have many places to call today.’

 
Mrs. Cook had prepared a wonderful meal but she kept apologizing for ‘shortchanging’ us on the eggs.”


To read more fun stories of life in Aroostook County during the 20th century, CLICK HERE.


Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Nobody Messes with Helen Allen

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

In the chapter titled "Getting Through My Freshman Year" we learn that children have been the same down through the ages, sometimes making sport of others that may be different than themselves.


Such was the case with Phin. He hadn't yet had his first shave and the peach fuzz on his face was a cause for ridicule (or "hazing" as he called it) from some of the upper classmen during the first week of school. He says:

All day I heard "Where did 'this' come from? I bet 'this' came from Buffalo."
"Where is Buffalo?" I asked.
"About four or five miles above Portage," they replied.
"I'm sorry boys," I answered, "I have never been up to Buffalo. My home is in Castle Hill."
They retorted, "Well probably Castle Hill doesn't have a barber either."

After being teased all week long, he was feeling that he might have made a mistake in coming to school. But an unlikely ally surfaced at recess on Friday...

At recess time on Friday, I was being used rather rough when a big stocky girl came along and asked, "Why do you put up with that? Wade right into them and fight back, kick hell right out of some of those boys." My reply was, "Oh, I do not believe in quarreling. I suppose they call this fun." Just then one of the boys reached out and pulled the fuzz on my face. The stout girl said, "Mother told me at noontime today that she and your father are cousins and she said if I was that boy I'd fight back." She went on to say, "My name is Helen Allen and I'm ready to take sides with you any time you want to pile up some of these fellows." About that time someone stepped back and thumbed his nose at Miss Allen. Quick as a flash, she grabbed him by the shirt collar and the seat of his pants and gave him an awful mauling. After she let him go, I said, "Boy, it is too bad to be so rough." She replied, "Too bad nothing. No one in this school is going to thumb their nose at me and get away with it."

This story has always given me a chuckle and I set about trying to find out about our cousin, Helen Allen.

She was born in 1895 just one year before Phin but died relatively young in 1935. She is buried in the Ashland Municipal Cemetery and has one child buried there with her. She married Albert Edward Spencer on June 6, 1923. Her parents were George Henry Allen and Josephine Walker Butler. Helen's mother Josephine was indeed a 1st cousin to Phin's father, Jasper Ellis. Their mothers, Abigail and Mary Jane Walker were sisters.

Cousin Helen seems like she had some spunk. I sure would have liked to have known her!!

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.



Thursday, June 18, 2015

Chapter Titles in Call Me Phin


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  1. The Beginning of My Life's Journey
  2. "Uncle Bill" Coffin Comes to My Rescue
  3. Off to School
  4. Preparing for High School
  5. Getting Through My Freshman Year
  6. Life with Dr. Hagerthy
    1. The Golden Calf
    2. The Woodpile
    3. The End of a Perfect Day
    4. A Trip to Presque Isle
    5. The Boat Ride at Portage Lake
    6. A Very Serious Burn
    7. Mitchell Bernard Accidentally Shot
    8. Helping with a Bad Fracture
    9. Machias Lake
    10. Dr. Hagerthy Makes a Deal
    11. Sarah
    12. A Day That Everything Seemed to Operate in Reverse
    13. Getting Poisoned
    14. More Memories while at Hagerthy's
    15. Doctor Hagerthy's Last Call
  7. Ashland
  8. Teaching at the Hill School
  9. Summer School
  10. The Mail Line
  11. Serving in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army
  12. Back Home and The Collins Lumber Company
  13. The Mapleton Local
  14. The Vacation
  15. A Decision of Once in a Lifetime
  16. My Experiences with the Maine Potato Growers Exchange
  17. Back to Castle Hill
  18. Family and Farm
  19. My Political Career
  20. Hospital Memories
  21. Moving to the New Hospital
  22. P. S.
  23. Premonitions? Perhaps
    1. A Bright Light in the Darkness
    2. The Case of Estella Wells
    3. The Passing of My Dad, Jasper O. Ellis
    4. A Happy Day for Nora Joe
    5. The Strange Case of Henry Archer
    6. Perhaps a Miracle
    7. Fred Gates
  24. The Lynching of Jim Cullen
  25. Acquiring Information of the Jim Cullen Lynching
  26. Weather Observations & Forecasts


To order your copy of Call Me Phin, CLICK HERE

Saturday, June 9, 2012

TAMC Day Proclamation

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Watching the You Tube video of the TAMC Day Proclamation from the Governor being read and seeing Board Member Gene Lynch caused me to reflect on the story told of the day the Presque Isle General Hospital moved from its old location on 2nd Street to the present location and the role Mr. Lynch's grandfather played in the process. As you can imagine, it was a busy day with much to do but because of the service of many in the community it was a successful endeavor. Here is an excerpt from Call Me Phin Chapter 21, "Moving to the New Hospital" telling the story of Clyde Lynch's involvement on that day:

"Mr. Clyde Lynch, owner and manager of Welding Supply, supplied our gas for cooking. The oxygen used in the hospital was also purchased from him. I called him and requested that he stop by at his convenience. He came and we visited the kitchen. I said, “Moving this equipment over to the new hospital could be a sticker. Would it be possible to hire a man or two to help with the moving? Mr. Cole will furnish the trucks.” Mr. Lynch replied, “Let’s go up to your office. We will talk about the project and I’ll give you an estimate of the cost and time required to move.” I hoped I wasn’t “put on the spot.” Mr. Cole had cautioned me not to spend too much. Mr. Lynch asked, “How early in the morning can we start working if we decide to undertake the job?” I answered, “Mrs. Akeley allowed we could begin moving at seven o’clock and if it took a lot of time she’d manage someway.” Mr. Lynch would not give me an estimate of the time required to do the job and, as to the cost, he said, “We’ll talk about that later.” He concluded by saying, “I will bring my own truck and help. Just leave the moving to me.”

On moving day, Mr. Lynch came with his truck and helper and parked in back of the hospital. At exactly seven o’clock, Mrs. Akeley called me at my office and said, “Okay to begin moving the kitchen equipment now.” I raced down and said, “Okay, Mr. Lynch, you can take over now.” They quietly began their work and by nine o’clock, when we were to begin moving the patients, the kitchen equipment and supplies had been moved out. Mrs. Akeley had a few hot plates ready to use in case food was needed for a patient on a special diet.

By eleven o’clock, the kitchen equipment was installed in the new hospital. Mr. Lynch found me and stated, “Tell Mr. Cole there is no charge. This will be our contribution to the good cause for which you are working.” Besides the truck and the labor, Mr. Lynch had donated considerable amounts of new pipe. I hardly knew how to express my appreciation for his kindness."

Thanks to the Lynch Family for their generous contributions to the community and their involvement in the cause of the hospital throughout the years.

To Order Your Copy of Call Me Phin, CLICK HERE.

Friday, June 8, 2012

June 9, 2012 is TAMC Day in Maine!!!

To Order Your Copy of Call Me Phin, CLICK HERE.

The Aroostook Medical Center (TAMC) is Celebrating 100 years of service and they are celebrating with a parade and community picnic on Saturday, June 9, 2012. You can learn the details on TAMC's website.

As a trustee on the Presque Isle Hospital Building Committee and eventually as the Hospital's Administrator, Phin Ellis played a large role in facilitating the construction of a new hospital and the move from the old building to the hopital's current location. You can read about these events in chapters 20 & 21 of Call Me Phin.

The following is an excerpt from Chapter 23, "Premonitions? Perhaps," which tells the story of Fred Gates and the beginnings of a tradition that lives on to this day at TAMC.

"My memories of Fred Gates, a fine gentleman, go back to my high school days. Not long after beginning my sophomore year, I became acquainted with the people at Union House, a hotel located near Dr. Hagerthy’s home.

The hotel was operated by two proprietors, Mr. Junkins and Charles Sleeper. Mr. Gates was married to Charles Sleeper’s daughter. Although Mr. Gates did not live at the hotel, he often assisted with the chores.

Nearly a quarter of a century later, when we had open roads, Mr. Gates was employed as a wingman on the state snow plow, which passed my home in Castle Hill. It was often necessary for the plow to be out nights during bad storms.

Many times, I would be up doing the barn chores when the plow passed by. I learned they only went down a mile or two below my home before turning and heading back toward Ashland. Another state plow from Presque Isle plowed the remainder of the State Road.

One cold blustery morning, it occurred to me that the men on the plow had been out most of the night and perhaps they would like to have a hot cup of coffee. They had passed my house and I knew they would be back in about half an hour. I hustled around feeding the stock in the barn then hurried to the house and put on a pot of coffee.

When the plow returned, I was standing beside the road waving for them to stop. At first, they thought there’d been a telephone call for them. I told them I thought it would be nice for them to take a break, come in and have a cup of hot coffee.

Mr. Gates and the driver of the plow were so pleased with the coffee and the doughnuts I served with it, that it seemed they could not thank me enough. This was just the beginning. Many other “coffee breaks” followed.

About the middle of August, 1956, I crossed paths with Fred Gates again when he was admitted to the Presque Isle General Hospital. I was administrator of the hospital at the time. Although he was now an old man, little did I realize his life’s journey was about to end.

I noticed on his admission form that he would be eighty years old on August 18th. I asked Mildred if she would make a birthday cake for one of the men who used to appreciate the coffee and doughnuts served to them on some of those cold stormy mornings, years ago. Mildred thought this would be a kind thing to do and agreed to make the cake. She frosted it, wrote happy birthday on it and decorated it with candles.

On the morning of August 18, I took the cake to the hospital and placed it on my desk. Some of the nurses spied it and asked, “What’s up?” I told them of my plans to present the cake to Mr. Gates. I said, “I became acquainted with this gentleman many years ago. When it is convenient, I would like to have several of you nurses come along with me. You can sing Happy Birthday.” Never in my life had I seen anyone so surprised or so pleased. He shared the cake with the nurses and thanked us over and over.

Later that morning, some of the nurses came to my office and allowed that this was one of the nicest things they had ever seen done for a patient. One of them said, “Mr. Ellis, Mr. Gates told us about your high school days and how you worked so hard to get through school. He seems to have forgotten about his illness and wants to talk about the good things in life.” During the next several days, I always found the time to stop by and say good morning to Mr. Gates.

On the night of September 5th, I was very restless all through the night. I thought I heard someone calling my name. Several times, I got up and went to the door to see if someone was there. I got up very early and had completed the chores when I got a premonition that I was wanted at the hospital. I kept this to myself for fear Mildred would say, “Don’t take your work so seriously.”

As soon as I’d eaten my breakfast, I hurried to Presque Isle. I entered my office and found a memo lying on the desk. It read, “Mr. Gates has been calling for you all night.”

It was not six-thirty, the night crew was getting ready to leave and the day shift was coming to work. There were so many things to check on that I didn’t go to see Mr. Gates right away. About eight o’clock, a nurse came running in saying, “Please come and see Mr. Gates. He wants you.”

I went to his room and sat by his bedside. He said, “Phin, I want to tell you something. It is something I have wanted to tell you for quite a few days. I’ve been thinking about the little birthday party you had for me. Really, it was wonderful and the best thing that has been done for me. It has made my stay here more pleasant.” He reached for my hand and continued on saying, “Thank you again, Phin. What you have done for me perhaps you can do for other patients while you work here at the hospital. I’m glad to see you this morning and I hope you have a good day. I’m sort of tired this morning. I didn’t rest much last night. Help me fix this pillow under my head and I’ll have a good rest while you go do your work.”

About noon, a nurse came and said, “Mr. Gates has gone into a coma.” This condition lasted a few days and Mr. Gates died on September 9th without regaining consciousness.

Mr. Gates’ appreciation of the cake impressed me so much that I decided to carry out his suggestion and do this for other patients.

From that fall of 1956 until I left the employ of the hospital on December 31, 1962, every patient, except those too ill to be disturbed, who had a birthday while they were a patient in the hospital, received a cake. The nurses always sang Happy Birthday to them when it was presented.

Many of the cakes were brought from home but sometimes I would purchase one at the grocery store and have the kitchen frost and decorate it for me. We averaged more than one birthday a week.

Mr. Gates suggestion was carried out and I have always felt that each recipient appreciated the gesture just as much as Mr. Gates did."

Today, the tradition of the birthday cakes is overseen by none other than Phin Ellis' own granddaughter, Stephanie. As part of her responsibilites as Coordinator of Nurses, she continues what her grandfather started in the Fall of 1956.

To Order Your Copy of Call Me Phin, CLICK HERE.

Saturday, August 14, 2010

Thursday, August 12, 2010

WAGM TV 8 Story about "Call Me Phin"

Phineas Ellis' daughter, Elaine, was interviewed on WAGM TV 8 about the book "Call Me Phin." Click on the link below to watch her interview.

http://www.wagmtv.com/newssource8/story/2010-08-11-ellis-book

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Friday, August 6, 2010

Names S - Y

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Here are the names (S - Y) mentioned in the book.

Savard, Paul (Paul Savard)
Sawyer, Ivan (Ivan Sawyer)
Schultz, Dr. (Dr. Schultz - from the State Farm)
Sewell, Sumner (Sumner Sewell - Governor of Maine)
Shapiro, Aaron (Aaron Shapiro)
Sharp, Lawrence (Lawrence Sharp)
Shea, Gerald (Gerald Shea)
Shepard, Mrs. (Mrs. Shepard - nurse; married Charles Boyce)
Sleeper, Charles (Charles Sleeper)
Sloat, Abe (Abe Sloat)
Sloat, Charles (Charles Sloat)
Sloat, Matilda (Matilda Sloat)
Sloat, Olive (Olive Sloat)
Smargonsky, Mose (Mose Smargonsky)
Smith, Alanda (Alanda Smith)
Smith, Frank (Frank Smith)
Smith, Fred (Fred Smith)
Smith, George (George Smith)
Smith, Guilford (Guilford Smith)
Smith, Mr. (Mr. Smith - law student)
Smith, Payson (Maine State Superintendent of Public Schools)
Somerville, Dr. Robert (Dr. Robert Somerville)
Soule, Francis A. (Francis A. Soule)
Stetson, Hazen (Hazen Stetson)
Stevens, Ruel (Ruel Stevens)
Stone, Leon (Leon Stone)
Stuart, Charles (Charles Stuart)
Swanback, John (John Swanback)
Tarr, Arthur (Arthur Tarr)
Taylor, Mr. (Mr. Taylor - proprietor of Taylor Livery Stable)
Theriault, Joe (Joe Theriault)
Thornton, S. S. (S. S. Thornton, jAshland Attorney)
Tompkins, Harvey A. (Harvey A. Tompkins)
Tompkins, Nathaniel (Nathaniel Tompkins - Speaker of the House - Maine)
Towne, Mr. (Mr. Towne - principal of Ashland High School)
Trafton, Alf (Alf Trafton)
Turner, E. M. (E. M. Turner - President of the Mapleton Local)
Turner, Hazel (Hazel Turner)
Turner, Will (Will Turner)
Twist, Dummy (Dummy Twist, Dummy Cullen)
Twist, Mrs. (Mrs. Twist)
Umphrey, Harry (Harry Umphrey)
Vinal, Mr. (Mr. Vinal)
Waddell, Mr. (Mr. Waddell - School Supervisor)
Waddell, Sarah (Sarah Waddell)
Waldron, Mr. (Mr. Waldron - Ashland lawyer)
Walker, Abbie (Abbie Walker, Abbie Wilcox Walker)
Walker, Arthur (Arthur Walker)
Walker, Avis (Avis Walker)
Walker, Hazen (Hazen Walker)
Warman, Fred (Fred Warman)
Watt, Archie (Archie Watt)
Watt, Jesse (Jesse Watt)
Webber, Mr. (Mr. Webber - Superintendent of Schools)
Webster, Frank (Frank Webster)
Wells, Estella (Estella Wells)
Wells, Jack (Jack Wells)
Welts, Josephine (Josephine Welts Ellis)
Wessenger, Mr. (Mr. Wessenger)
Westerman, Hedge (Hedge Westerman)
Wheeler, Mrs. (Mrs. Wheeler - Elmer Howard's sister)
White, Frank (Frank White)
White, Miss (Miss White - Hazen Stetson's secretary)
Wieden, Dr. Clifford O. T. (Dr. Clifford O. T. Wieden)
Wilcox, Don (Don Wilcox)
Wilcox, Eucebia Gilman (Eucebia Gilman Wilcox)
Wilcox, Guy (Guy Wilcox)
Wilcox, Lonny (Lonny Wilcox)
Wilcox, Steve (Steve Wilcox)
Wildes, Mr. & Mrs. (Mr. & Mrs. Wildes)
Williamson, Samuel (Samuel Williamson)
Winslow, Orin (Orin Winslow)
Wood, Harold (Harold Wood)
Wood, Louise (Louise Wood)
Wood, Mrs. (Mrs. Wood)
Wood, Rob (Rob Wood)
Woodman, Ernest (Ernest Woodman)
York, Acil (Acil York)
York, Ike (Ike York)
York, Lewis (Lewis York)
York, Louise (Louise York)
York, Mrs. Ike (Mrs. Ike York)

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Names K - R

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Here are the names (K - R) mentioned in the book.

Kalloch, Mr. (Mr. Kalloch)
Kelley, Jarve (Jarve Kelley)
Kelly, George (George Kelly)
Kelly, Nell (Nell Kelly)
Kennedy, Mr. Laurel (Mr. Laurel Kennedy)
Kenney, Bernard (Bernard Kenney)
Knowland, Charles (Charles Knowland)
Knowland, Dr. George (Dr. George Knowland)
Knowles, Maurice (Maurice Knowles)
Koslosky, Amos (Amos Koslosky)
Lamoreau, Henry (Henry Lamoreau)
Leavitt, Mr. (Mr. Leavitt - the teamster)
Libby, Mr. (Mr. Libby - Hotel owner in Oxbow)
Libby, Mr. (Mr. Libby - Superintendent of Schools)
Loring, Fred (Fred Loring)
Lovely, Delance (Delance Lovely)
Lynch, Clyde (Clyde Lynch)
Magill, Bruce (Bruce Magill)
Magill, Mr. (Mr. Magill - road foreman)
Mansur, Dr. (Dr. Mansur - a dentist)
Mansur, Mrs. (Mrs. Mansur)
Martin, George E. (George E. Martin)
Martin, Whit (Whit Martin)
Maynard, Harry (Harry Maynard)
McAlphine, Albert (Albert McAlphine)
McAlphine, James (James McAlphine)
McConnell, Fred (Fred McConnell)
McCormack, Jim (Jim McCormack)
McGaughy, Mr. (Mr. McGaughy - Superintendent of Schools)
McGuire, Darius (Darius McGuire)
McKay, Charles (Charles McKay)
McKay, Walter (Walter McKay)
McKay, Walter (Walter McKay)
McLellan, Andrew (Andrew McLellan)
McLellan, Anna (Anna McLellan, Grammy McLellan)
McLellan, Edwin (Edwin McLellan)
McLellan, Harold (Harold McLellan)
McLellan, Kitty (Kitty McLellan)
McQuarrie, Mrs. (Mrs. McQuarrie)
Medkiff, Mrs. (Mrs. Medkiff)
Merriman, Mr. (Mr. Merriman)
Michaud, Fred (Fred Michaud)
Michaud, Fred (Fred Michaud)
Moores, George (George Moores)
Moores, Wilmer (Wilmer Moores)
Morgan, Mr. (Mr. Morgan - proprietor of Morgan's Furniture Store)
Morin, Mack (Mack Morin)
Morrison, Archie (Archie Morrison)
Morrison, Charles (Charles Morrison)
Morrison, May Wilcox (May Wilcox Morrison)
Morrison, Ralph (Ralph Morrison)
Morrow, Alfreda (Alfreda Morrow)
Morrow, Peter (Peter Morrow)
Morton, Edward "Deak" (Edward Morton, Deak Morton)
Mosher, Climena (Climena Mosher)
Muskie, Edmund (Edmund Muskie - Governor of Maine)
Mutty, Gertrude (Gertrude Mutty)
Nason, Lizzie (Lizzie Nason)
Nilson, Mr. (Mr. Nilson)
Oakes, Alice (Alice Oakes)
Oakes, Eli (Eli Oakes)
Orcutt, Charles (Charles Orcutt)
Page, Joseph (Joseph Page)
Page, Ray (Ray Page)
Parker, Dr. (Dr. Parker)
Paul, Joe (Joe Paul)
Payne, Frederick G. (Frederick G. Payne - Governor of Maine)
Perry, Nathan (Nathan Perry)
Phair, James (James Phair)
Porter, F. J. (F. J. Porter)
Porter, Flavious (Flavious Porter)
Porter, Roger (Roger Porter)
Porter, William (William Porter)
Powers, George (George Powers)
Prosser, Perry (Perry Prosser)
Pulcifer, Mrs. (Mrs. Pulcifer - a midwife)
Rafford, Ervin (Ervin Rafford)
Rafford, Maria (Maria Rafford)
Rand, Arthur (Arthur Rand)
Rand, Harry (Harry Rand)
Randall, Bert (Bert Randall)
Randall, Burt (Burt Randall)
Rathbun, James (James Rathbun)
Reed, John (John Reed - Govenor of Maine)
Richardson, Edith (Edith Richardson)
Richardson, Everett (Everett Richardson)
Richardson, Gus (Gus Richardson)
Richardson, Peter (Peter Richardson)
Richardson, Rose (Rose Richardson Archer)
Russell, Mr. (Mr. Russell - Superintendent of Schools - Ashland)

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Names D - J

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Here are the names (D - J) mentioned in the book:

Daggett, Charles (Charles Daggett)
DeMerchant, John (John DeMerchant)
Dingwall, Neva (Neva Dingwall)
Dinsmore, Mr. (Mr. Dinsmore)
Doble, Dr. (Dr. Doble)
Dobson, Dr. Lindley (Dr. Lindley Dobson)
Donahue, Dr. (Dr. Donahue)
Dorsey, Mr. (Mr. Dorsey of Fort Fairfield)
Dudley, David (David Dudley)
Dudley, Ervin L. (Ervin L. Dudley)
Dudley, F. M. (F. M. Dudley)
Dudley, Forest (Forest Dudley)
Dudley, M. A. (M. A. Dudley)
Dudley, Mel (Mel Dudley)
Dudley, Mrs. Sandford (Mrs. Sanford Dudley)
Dudley, Robert (Robert Dudley)
Dudley, Sanford (Sanford Dudley)
Eber, Charles (Charles Eber)
Ellis, Alonzo (Alonzo Ellis)
Ellis, Byron (Byron Ellis)
Ellis, Calvin (Calvin Ellis)
Ellis, Dorcas (Dorcas Ellis, Dorcas Ellis Chandler)
Ellis, Eben (Eben Ellis)
Ellis, Edith (Edith Ellis, Edith Ellis Bird)
Ellis, Elaine (Elaine Ellis)
Ellis, Forest (Forest Ellis)
Ellis, Fred (Fred Ellis)
Ellis, Hope (Hope Ellis)
Ellis, Jasper O. (Jasper O. Ellis)
Ellis, Jim (Jim Ellis)
Ellis, Joe (Joe Ellis)
Ellis, Josephine Welts (Jospehine Welts Ellis)
Ellis, Leona (Leona Ellis)
Ellis, Lucy E. Wilcox (Lucy E. Wilcox Ellis)
Ellis, Luther (Luther Ellis)
Ellis, Malcolm (Malcolm Ellis)
Ellis, Mildred Chandler (Mildred Chandler Ellis)
Ellis, Myrtle (Myrtle Ellis)
Ellis, Opal (Opal Ellis)
Ellis, Phineas Franklin (Phin Ellis, Phineas Ellis, Phineas F. Ellis)
Ellis, Sarah (Sarah Ellis)
Ellis, Wilson (Wilson Ellis)
Emack, Grace (Grace Emack)
Fisher, Dr. Dean H. (Dr. Dean H. Fisher)
Fisher, Nelson (Nelson Fisher)
Flannigan, Charles (Charles Flannigan)
Flannigan, Ed (Ed Flannigan)
Flannigan, Maude (Maude Flannigan Chandler)
Flewelling, Alonzo (Alonzo Flewelling)
Flint, Bert (Bert Flint)
Folsom, Dwight (Dwight Folsom)
Forbes, H. R. (H. R. Forbes)
Foss, Halsted (Halsted Foss)
Foss, Herbert (Herbert Foss)
Foster, Daniel (Daniel Foster)
Gardiner, William Tudor (William Tudor Gardiner - Govenor of Maine)
Gardner, Alice (Alice Gardner)
Gardner, Bettina (Bettina Gardner)
Gardner, Herbert (Herbert Gardner)
Gardner, Nancy (Mrs. Nancy Gardner)
Garland, Eben (Eben Garland)
Gates, Fred (Fred Gates)
Geary, Ray (Ray Geary)
Giberson, Dr. (Dr. Giberson)
Gilbert, Dr. Percy (Dr. Percy Gilbert)
Gilman, Horton (Horton Gilman)
Glidden, B. B. (B. B. Glidden)
Goslin, Simeon (Simeon Goslin)
Gould, Arthur R. (Arthur R. Gould)
Green, Mrs. (Mrs. Green - Secretary of Hospital Board of Trustees)
Greenwood, Mr. (Mr. Greenwood - Ashland Post Master)
Griffin, Albert (Albert Griffin)
Griffin, Lewis (Lewis Griffin)
Hagerthy, Belle Trafton (Belle Trafton Hagerthy)
Hagerthy, Bert (Bert Hagerthy)
Hagerthy, Dana (Dana Hagerthy)
Hagerthy, Dr. Albert (Dr. Albert Hagerthy)
Hallet, Whit (Whit Hallet)
Hamilton, Mr. (Mr. Hamilton - a lawyer)
Hansen, Abbie (Abbie Hansen)
Hayden, Annie (Annie Hayden)
Hayden, Cyrus (Cyrus Hayden)
Hayden, Granville (Granville Hayden)
Hayden, Mrs. (Mrs. Hayden)
Helfrich, Dr. (Dr. Helfrich)
Hews, Ray (Ray Hews)
Higgins, Mr. (Mr. Higgins)
Hill, George E. (George E. Hill - Speaker of the House - Maine)
Hoffses, J. T. (J. T. Hoffses)
Hoffses, John (John Hoffses)
Hopper, William (William Hopper, Bill Hopper)
Hoppin, Mrs. (Mrs. Hoppin - Clinic Supervisor)
Howard, Elmer (Elmer Howard)
Howard, Mrs. Jesse (Mrs. Jesse Howard)
Hoyt, Dave (Dave Hoyt)
Hubbard, William (William Hubbard)
Huges, Constable (Constable Hughes)
Hughes, Harry (Harry Hughes)
Ireland, Effie Roberts (Effie Roberts Ireland)
Ireland, Elbert (Elbert Ireland)
Irvine, Hollis (Hollis Irvine)
Iverson, Oscar (Oscar Iverson)
Jackson, Kenneth (Kenneth Jackson)
Joe, Nora Brown (Nora Brown Joe)
Joe, Philip (Philip Joe)
Johnson, Clyde (Clyde Johnson)
Johnson, Fred (Fred Johnson)
Jones, Rev. David (Rev. David Jones)
Jose, Bion (Bion Jose)
Judkins, Andrew (Andrew Judkins)
Judkins, Ernest (Ernest Judkins)
Judkins, Mary (Mary Judkins)
Judkins, Mrs. Ernest (Mrs. Ernest Judkins)
Junkins, Ed (Ed Junkins)

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Names A - C

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Here are the names (A - C) mentioned in the book:

?, Hannah (Hannah ? - worked for the Hagerthy's)
?, Lottie (Lottie ? - hired girl for the Hagerthy's)
Adams, Jim (Jim Adams)
Akeley, Mrs. (Mrs. Akeley - Hospital Dietitian)
Akeley, Mrs. (Mrs. Akeley - married John Swanback)
Akeley, Will (Will Akeley)
Allen, Helen (Helen Allen)
Alley, Braighton (Braighton Alley)
Alley, Brighton (Brighton Alley)
Alley, Crystal (Crystal Alley)
Alley, Eva (Eva Alley)
Alley, George (George Alley)
Alley, Georgia "Nellie" (Georgia Alley, Nellie Alley)
Alley, Inza (Inza Alley)
Anderson, Beatrice (Beatrice Anderson)
Anderson, Charles (Charles Anderson)
Anderson, George (George Anderson)
Andrews, Mrs. (Mrs. Andrews)
Archer, Henry (Henry Archer)
Archer, Herman (Herman Archer)
Archer, Laura (Laura Archer)
Archer, Rose Richardson (Rose Richardson Archer)
Archibald, Bernard (Bernard Archibald)
Armstrong, Augusta (Augusta Armstrong - a corsetiere)
Ashby, George F. (George F. Ashby)
Ayer, Paul (Paul Ayer)
Barker, Fred (Fred Barker)
Barrows, Lewis O. (Lewis O. Barrows - Governor of Maine)
Bateman, Professor L. C. (Professor L. C. Bateman)
Beaulieu, Mrs. Simon (Mrs. Simon Beaulieu)
Beaulieu, Simon (Simon Beaulieu)
Beck, Andrew J. "Jack" (Andrew J. Beck, Jack Beck)
Belyea, John (John Belyea)
Bernard, Josephine (Josephine Bernard)
Bernard, Mitchell (Mitchell Bernard)
Bernard, Mrs. (Mrs. Bernard)
Berry, John (John Berry)
Bird, Edith Ellis (Edith Ellis Bird)
Bird, Minot (Minot Bird)
Bird, Will (Will Bird)
Bishop, Raymond (Raymond Bishop)
Bishop, Tom (Tom Bishop)
Bolstridge, Walter (Walter Bolstridge)
Boone, Dr. Storer (Dr. Storer Boone)
Boyce, Charles
Bragdon, Hadley (Hadley Bragdon)
Brann, Louis J. (Louis J. Brann - Governor of Maine)
Brennan, Walter
Breslette, James (James Breslette)
Brewer, Herman (Herman Brewer)
Bridgham, Hadley (Hadley, Bridgham)
Bridgham, Willis (Willis Bridgham)
Briggs, Mrs. (Mrs. Briggs - Frank Tarr's aunt)
Brooks, Charles (Charles Brooks)
Brown, Annis (Annis Brown)
Brown, Harrison (Harrison Brown)
Brown, Lester (Lester Brown)
Brown, Margaret (Margaret Brown)
Brown, Mrs. (Mrs. Brown - Supervisor of Nurses)
Brown, Nancy Marie (Nancy Marie Brown)
Burby, Gus (Gus Burby)
Burns, J. Frederick (J. Frederick Burns)
Burtt, Dr. (Dr. Burtt - a veterinarian)
Bushy, Raymond (Raymond Bushy)
Carney, Joseph (Jospeh Carney)
Carney, Jr., Peter (Peter Carney, Jr.)
Carney, Peter (Peter Carney)
Carney, Tom (Tom Carney)
Carter, Dr. (Dr. Carter)
Chandler, Charles (Charles Chandler, C.G.R. Chandler)
Chandler, Dorothy (Dorothy Chandler)
Chandler, Frank (Frank Chandler)
Chandler, Lawrence (Lawrence Chandler)
Chandler, Maude Flannigan (Maude Flannigan Chandler)
Chandler, Mildred (Mildred Chandler Ellis)
Chapman, Dr. (Dr. Chapman)
Charette, Dick (Dick Charette)
Clark, Mr. (Mr. Clark - Mrs. Bernard's father)
Clark, Mrs. William (Mrs. William Clark)
Clark, William (William Clark)
Cloukey, Johnny (Johnny Cloukey)
Coffin, Bill (Bill Coffin, "Uncle" Bill Coffin)
Coffin, Fred (Fred Coffin)
Coffin, Lawrence (Lawrence Coffin)
Colbun, Mrs. William (Mrs. William Colbun)
Colbun, Will (Will Colbun, William Colbun)
Cole, Vaughn (Vaughn Cole)
Collins, Herschel Douglas (Herschel Douglas Collins)
Collins, Samual W. (Samual W. Collins - 1811 - 1899)
Collins, Wilson (Wilson Collins, Samual Wilson Collins)
Cook, Chester (Chester Cook)
Cook, Eleanor (Eleanor Cook)
Cook, George R. (George R. Cook)
Cook, Granville (Granville Cook)
Craig, Benton (Benton Craig)
Craig, Mrs. Penn (Mrs. Penn Craig)
Craig, Penn (Penn Craig)
Crocket, Mr. (Mr. Crocket)
Cronin, Miss (Miss Cronin - English teacher)
Crory, Isaac (Isaac Crory)
Crory, Mrs. Isaac (Mrs. Isaac Crory)
Cross, Constance (Constance Cross)
Crouse, Wilmont (Wilmont Crouse)
Cullen, Dummy (Dummy Cullen, Dummy Twist)
Cullen, Jim (Jim Cullen)

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Businesses and Such

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Here is a list of businesses, schools, etc. mentioned in the book:

57th Ammunition Train
A. M. Smith's Hardware Store
Aroostook Central Institute
Ashland Grange Store
Ashland House (a hotel)
Ashland Mill Co.
Ashland Opera House
Ashland Trust Company
Bangor & Aroostook Railroad
Bean's Garage
Bloody Half Acre
Bridge Construction Company
Bridgham's Store (grocery)
Burnham Holm's Farm
Camp Devens, Massachusetts
Camp Eustis, Virginia
Caribou Woolen Mill
Cyr's Slaughter House
Dudley School
Dudley's Store
Federal Land Bank
Fort Myer, Arlington, Virginia
Fort Slocum, New York
Girls' School at Hallowell
H.D. Collins Lumber Company
Haystack School
Hill School
Indian Head Plywood Corp.
International Harvester Machine Company
Jones' Brothers Farm
Jones' Fish Market (Bangor)
L. S. Bean Co.
Little Red Schoolhouse
Mapleton Community School
Mapleton Local of the Aroostook Federation of Farmers
McLellan School
Men's Reformatory at South Windham
Moran School
Morgan's Furniture Store
Normal School - Presque Isle
Porter School
Pyle School
Richardson School
S.W. Collins Lumber Company
Shea Realty Co.
Shean Accounting Service
Sheridan Mill
South School (at Squa Pan)
State Sanatorium in Presque Isle
Taylor Livery Stable
The Exchange Hotel
The State Farm
Thornton School
Tilley School
Trafton School
Union House
Walker School
Washburn Bank
Washburn Trust Company
Welding Supply
Women's Reformatory at Skowhegan

To order your copy of "Call Me Phin" CLICK HERE.

Sunday, June 6, 2010

Now Available!

We are pleased to announce that Call Me Phin is now available for purchase. To get your copy, CLICK HERE.

This book is an autobiographical account of the life and times of Phineas F. Ellis of Castle Hill, Aroostook County, Maine. Mr. Ellis was first and foremost a true public servant. From the bold stand that he took that resulted in a new mail line out of Ashland, Maine, to the financial sacrifices he made to serve in the Maine State Legislature, to the many acts of service and kindness he rendered during the years he served as the Town Manager of Mapleton and Castle Hill, Phin gave a great deal to all around him.

As we join Phin on his journey, we are able to watch over his shoulder and catch a glimpse into the lives and observe the culture of the people in rural Aroostook County during the early to mid 20th century. We learn of the infamous lynching of Jim Cullen, hear the story of a U.S. Senator’s grandfather nearly losing his life at a remote lumber camp, and are told of premonitions received as he relates stories of being inspired to help others. We also learn how the Arthur R. Gould Memorial Hospital in Presque Isle, Maine was established and observe the functions of the new hospital through Phin’s role as its first administrator.

Phineas Franklin Ellis was a pioneer who understood the value of hard work. He was full of humility and determined to help those around him by taking an active role in bringing positive changes to their lives.

This book will inspire and delight. It will remind you of where you came from and will help you see what is most important in life.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Obituary of Phineas F. Ellis

Phineas Franklin Ellis, 79, died at a Mars Hill hospital May 6, 1976 following a long illness. He was born in Castle Hill, August 15, 1896, the son of Jasper O. and Lucy E. Wilcox Ellis. He graduated from Ashland High School as valedictorian in 1915, attended Presque Isle Normal School, now known as University of Maine at Presque Isle, taught school in Ashland (Frenchville area) in 1915 and 1916.

On January 1, 1917 he became the first mail carrier on the RFD 2 mail line out of Ashland that he helped establish by petitioning the government. He served in the medical corps in World War I. Upon returning from the Army, he became manager of the Mapleton Local of the Aroostook Federation of Farmers. He married Mildred Chandler on August 22, 1923, moved to Caribou and was employed by the Maine Potato Growers Exchange known as the “Co-Op.” He returned to Castle Hill, built a home and went into farming and lumbering.

His political career began in April of 1919 when elected third selectman to the Town of Castle Hill. He was elected first selectman and chairman of the board in 1920 – 21. From 1927 to 1935 he was town auditor for Castle Hill, serving again as selectman in 1939 and again 1940. In 1941 the town adopted the town manager system and he became the first town manager for Castle Hill from 1941 to 1956 and Castle Hill and Mapleton from 1947 to 1956. He was representative to the 87th Legislature in 1935, the 88th in 1937, and the 93rd in 1947, serving Ashland, Castle Hill, Masardis, Portage, Garfield, Nashville, and Ox Bow. He clerked on the Taxation Committee for the 89th Legislature in 1939 and for the 90th in 1941.

He was a member of the Castle Hill School Board for 28 consecutive years and was president of the Presque Isle General Hospital Board in April of 1956 when he accepted the position as administrator of the hospital. He worked toward having a new hospital on a new site. The Arthur R. Gould Memorial Hospital opened for business in February of 1960 with Mr. Ellis as its first administrator. He remained administrator until June 1961 when he was appointed director of public relations for the hospital. He remained in this position about one and one-half years before retiring at age 67. The “retirement” ended when he accepted the job as head of the supply department of the Indian Head Plywood Corp. He remained in this position until August, 1973 when at age 77 he actually retired.

He had been a 4-H leader, member of the Washburn Rotary Club, member of the Grange, and the Farm Bureau Extension. He was a member of the State Road Advent Church. He became very interested in the tales he heard throughout the years regarding the Cullen lynching. In 1952 he researched and compiled a complete account of the double slaying of Hayden and Hubbard which led to the vigilante hanging of Jim Cullen. He had been asked throughout the years to lecture at Rotarys, Granges, and schools on Maine’s only lynching.

He had been active in his retirement, gardening, lecturing, attending meetings for the senior citizens and writing his book “Call Me Phin.” In his own words, “I have worked quietly down through the years suggesting something for the better whenever I had the chance and just hope to someday leave a few footprints on the sands of time.”

He is survived by his wife, Mildred Chandler Ellis, Mapleton; one son, Malcolm, Ashland; two daughters, Mrs. Myron Myrtle Goodwin, Kennebunk, Mrs. Eugene Elaine Hotham, Presque Isle; four brothers, Luther, Alonzo, and Wilson, all of Castle Hill, Forest, Ashland; three sisters, Mrs. Dorcas Chandler, Kittery, Mrs. Opal Ellis, Ashland, Mrs. Murray Sarah Murphy, Presque Isle; 10 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren.

Friends may call at Graves Funeral Home, Presque Isle, Friday from 7 – 9 p.m. Funeral services will be held at the funeral home Saturday at 1 p.m. with Rev. David Ross, pastor of the State Road Advent Christian Church, officiating. Burial will be in the Ellis Cemetery, Ashland. Those who wish may contribute to the State Road Advent Christian Church, in his memory, or to the Memorial Fund of the Arthur R. Gould Memorial Hospital.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Coming Soon

In 1977, Phineas F. Ellis’ autobiography, Call Me Phin, was published posthumously by his family. Phin was a remarkable man, a pioneer, who touched the lives of many people through his work and associations.

This book is part of his legacy and because we do not want his story to fade away, we are republishing it.

Call Me Phin will be made available for purchase through this site in the near future.